STRONG BRANDS MANAGES CUSTOMER SELECTION. A STRONG BRAND CAN CONVEY SPECIFIC USER IMAGERY THAT SPEAKS TO THE TARGET MARKET. HENCE, IT REINFORCES THEIR TRUST IN COMPLIMENTARY OFFERS FROM THE BRAND’S OWNERS. STRONG BRANDS ENGENDER GREATER LOYALTY WHEN THE PURCHASE DECISION IS PERCEIVED AS HIGH RISK. SOME PURCHASES ARE MORE RISKY THAN OTHERS. THE HIGHER THE RISK, THE MORE IMPORTANT THE BRAND BECOMES IN THE PURCHASE CRITERION.

Monday, October 11, 2010

MySpace goes blank

Image

MySpace has an identity crisis. Can a new logo revive the dying social network?

Attendees at Friday's Warm Gun design conference in San Francisco had a sneak peak at MySpace's upcoming brand relaunch. Presented by Mike Macadaa, MySpace vice president of user experience and design, the new logo marks the biggest visual change in the MySpace brand since its launch in 2003.

Thursday, September 23, 2010

Internet Explorer Version Who Cares?.0

Internet Explorer Logo, Before and After

A long time ago, like, totally, in the 1990s the de facto browsers were Microsoft's Internet Explorer (IE) and Netscape, the equivalent of today's Safari and Firefox. The latter in both cases had more geek cred, while the former had better looks.

Back in those days I always chose IE, mostly because the broken image icon of Netscape was far more scary. At the turn of the century as browser competition increased, IE's stronghold on the market dipped deeper than the Titanic and has become not just a source of frustration for programmers who need to concoct hacks to make things work specifically for IE, but it's also a sad punchline. They even managed to completely alienate the growing Mac population by discontinuing development for that platform in 2003.

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Brands on the move

What makes these designs unique is that they are designed to be in motion. They are not static designs that were juiced up later.

Moving Brands for Swisscom

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Cartoon Network Enters the Grid

Cartoon Network Logo, Before and After

Launched in 1992 by Atlanta-based Turner Broadcasting, the Cartoon Network was a godsend to, well, cartoon lovers with 24-hour cartoon programming, mostly re-runs. In the past few years, with original series and its hipster- and geek-attracting Adult Swim block in the wee hours of the night, Cartoon Network (CN) has become one of the most attractive and genuine channels on television.

From its humble beginnings, CN is now broadcast in 166 countries. But its identity has been a little wobbly in the last two years or so with an initial switch from the well-known checkerboard logo to a short-lived, perspective acronym that, I'm guessing, didn't fair too well as it just got shelved earlier this year when CN started to run a new on-air identity in May, designed by animation powerhouse Brand New School in collaboration with the talented in-house team at CN. This week a new range of on-air identity applications started to roll out.

Saturday, August 07, 2010

Famous brand name changes –What’s in name!!

Although I could not uncover the price of Google logo in my research regarding cost of famous logos, but what I did find out during the research was that Google was originally named ‘Backrub’.

This made me realize that many companies that are now famous under their present brand names weren’t so prominent under their previous names. Some corporate name changes took place due to corporate mergers, some changed their identity to keep aloof from controversies while other corporate name changes are the result of logo redesign. Irrespective of the reason, a change in company name can have dual consequences. It may either boost the previous brand equity to the skies or deplete it completely. Below are 10 of the most famous corporate name changes that ever took place.

001>>
Accenture

(old name)

Andersen Consulting


Initially known as ‘Andersen Consulting’, this firm is regarded for one of the worst corporate name changes in history. The present name 'Accenture' was adopted in 2001 for a whopping $100 million. The name was an apparent derivation from the phrase 'Accent on the future'. The change finally proved fortunate, clearing it from a scandal involving Enron.